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Stephen Colbert writes an op ed for Glamour about gender equality.
Via: Glamour
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Stephen Colbert took a break from making random cable access shows in Michigan with Eminem to write an opinion about gender equality in Glamour magazine.

Ever since he left The Colbert Report to take over for David Letterman's The Late Show, which begins September 9, Colbert has been staying in the headlines through both hilarious stunts like the one above and drawing attention to his personal causes.

His editorial in Glamour combines his irreverent, often silly, humor with real questions about the state of gender equality:

And mine is not the only field that lacks enough women. Where are all the lady blacksmiths? What about the bait-and-tackle shopkeepers, pool maintenance professionals, building superintendents, or CEOs of Fortune 500 companies? Why are all those minions shaped like tiny phalluses? Why did Mad Max get top billing in Fury Road when he was essentially just a grunting tripod for Charlize Theron's rifle? Of course, historically, our thriving U.S. president industry definitely skews male—but that could change in 2016. Carly Fiorina, all eyes are on you.

Even when women do succeed, their stories often aren't told. Did you know that the first computer, ENIAC, was programmed by six female mathematicians? If it weren't for those pioneering women, we might not have computers at all. And then how would people read empowering listicles like "20 Hot Actresses Without Makeup! (#5 Will Make You Question God!)"?



And through out it all, despite falling into some strange tangents, he presents a promise for how The Late Show will function under his hosting.



Point is, I'm here for you, and that means I'm going to do my best to create a Late Show that not only appeals to women but also celebrates their voices. These days TV would have you believe that being a woman means sensually eating yogurt, looking for ways to feel confident on heavy days, and hunting for houses. But I'm going to make a show that truly respects women, because I know that there's more than one way to be one. Maybe you're a woman who likes women. Maybe you like women and men. Maybe you're a woman who's recently transitioned. Maybe you're a guy who's reading this magazine because your girlfriend bought a copy and it looked interesting.



It's just another example of how proactive Colbert is about his influence and how he chooses to use his promotional time.

Jon stewart says goodbye to the Daily Show in a big way.
Via: Vox
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Last night, Jon Stewart hosted his final turn on The Daily Show, marking an end to the 16-year run that turned the nightly satire into a cultural force.

The evening began with a regular report on the GOP debate from earlier in the night, then turned into a revolving door of big names and old friends. They thanked Stewart for his work, gave some advice and made him cry. Much feels.

Vox recapped much of the proceedings:

Fittingly, then, the "star-studded" portion of the evening was right at the top. Beginning with three of the show's current correspondents — Jessica Williams, Hasan Minhaj, and Jordan Klepper — claiming to be on the ground covering the night's Republican debate, the segment grew and grew, until it encompassed essentially every major voice in the show's history, dipping all the way back to figures like Mo Rocca and Vance DeGeneres, from Stewart's very early days, and even working in original Daily Show host Craig Kilborn. It was like the alt-comedy version of This Is Your Life. There was even time for a visit from Stewart's biggest targets.

But the biggest moments were for Oliver and Colbert. The former, now on HBO, gently mocked his old boss for continuing to work within the constraints of basic cable, pretending to have no idea what commercials were. The latter made Stewart tear up, first with an elaborate analogy where Colbert was Sam and Stewart Frodo Baggins, then with a heartfelt speech about how much Stewart had meant to all of them.

All those correspondents had one final story on which to report — a group hug.

Can you feel the fake news love?



Stewart finished the night with an endearing entreaty, imploring everyone to beware the staggering amount of bullsh*t that sits around the world.



There was one more final thing that had to happen: Born to Run, performed by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band.



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July 8 was a tough day for America and people with highly accute anxiety. 

With technical errors plaguing everything from the New York Stock Exchange to all flights from United Airlines, it seemed like our technology infused lifestyle was soon to be demolished in a flash of dystopian prophecy. 

Hell, some outlets stuck their tongue firmly in their cheek and straight up told us to panic. 

Stephen Colbert decided to take them up on this offer. He doesn't take over the Late Show from David Letterman until September, so he has plenty of time to freak out over everything. 

Plus, he probably ran out of cable access channels willing to give him copious amounts of screen time.
stephen colbert,late night,marquee,David Letterman
Via: ohhleary
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As Stephen Colbert continues to prepare to take over David Letterman's spot on The Late Show, he's doing more than celebrating marriage equality and appearing on Michigan's public access.

He's bringing his face to his new Manhattan digs and trying to help the neighbors at the same time.

You'll recall the famous marquee that welcomed visitors to the Ed Sullivan Theater and Letterman's former late night homestay.



Well as they renovate the space for Colbert's September premiere, a new sign appeared July 6.



Behold, Stephen Colbert's new awning.

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So, Stephen Colbert just uploaded a 40-minute show that he did on Monroe, Michigan cable access. 

It's full of interview, nail polish competitions, Monroe news, giant checks, a Bob Seger singalong, oh, and actually Eminem. 

Clearly, Colbert and his writers are just trying to get themselves limber before heading to the Late Show in September to replace David Letterman. What a wonderful way to do so. 




Everyone looks limber in this. Even the stars in this clip of the upcoming movie South Paw that was featured on the show:


I mean, there's just no real explanation for this lucky peice of Internet gold.

Just thank the gloriousness of Stephen Colbert.
 
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"It's hard to believe that gay American's acheived full constitutional personhood, just five years after corporations did."

If this video is anything, besides being hilarious, it's a sign that you can take the Colbert out of the Report, but you can't take the Report out of the Colbert. It seems like politics will still play at least some part in his ongoing public persona, even if his beard will not.

This is great news. Except about that beard thing.
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In preparation for his September debut as the replacement for David Letterman on the CBS Late Show, Stephen Colbert has had to say goodbye to his freedom beard. The Colbeard (we're assuming it's capitalized) signified Colbert's freedom from 10 years behind the desk of the Colbert Report

He took to trimming it into a variety of shapes, trying to lure young people to his show.



Not only is this the first time we've seen that fresh face on Colbert in a while, but it's also been a bit since we've seen the Colbert Report personality take a bit of a back seat. It's neat to see a Colbert who is just plain silly. And who also hates hot dogs, apparently.



It is sad that he had to give up such a nice beard. Especially since there was a certain other talk show host actually got to promote his beard...

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